From The Theory of Mimesis to Moral Corruption in The Family: A Literary Critique of Helon Habila’s Measuring Time

Volume 2, Issue 1, Article 5 - 2019

Authors: Confidence Gbolo Sanka;Abigail Mensah; Francis Elsbend Kofigah

Copyright © 2019 . This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Abstract

This paper investigates the motif of moral corruption that has taken root in the modern family. The focus is on Helon Habila’s novel, Measuring time, and analysis is provided on Habila’s use of language, characterisation, symbolism, collocation and the saturation technique to expose the motif of corruption that recurs in several aspects of human life and existence. It is the position of this paper that literature is a representation of life, and as a matter of fact, the key issues presented in the novel through different techniques reflect the reality and universality of moral corruption as seen in human behavior and experience. In this light, the meaning of corruption is applied to one key theme raised by the author: the concept of the broken family together with other related issues of corruption observed in the wars and politics of Nigeria and her sister African countries. Again, this paper investigates Habila’s use of language as an intriguing medium to communicate his views on corruption as captured in Measuring time.

How To Cite This Article

Confidence Gbolo Sanka;Abigail Mensah; Francis Elsbend Kofigah (2019) From The Theory of Mimesis to Moral Corruption in The Family: A Literary Critique of Helon Habila’s Measuring Time
Bulletin of Advanced English Studies Vol 2 (1) 42-54